We love TedEd! Here is a great video explaining something that most people do without thinking- taking pain medications!

Some people take aspirin or ibuprofen to treat everyday aches and pains, but how exactly do the different classes of pain relievers work? Learn about the basic physiology of how humans experience pain, and the mechanics of the medicines we’ve invented to block or circumvent that discomfort.

Lesson by George Zaidan, animated by Augenblick Studios.

Pain Fighting Foods

Your diet can have a huge impact on your pain levels, and your health in general. Here are 7 foods that can help decrease your pain!

Chronic pain can be so pervasive that drugs and even mind-body approaches may not be enough to give you a break. As many as four out of five people with chronic pain have tried alternative remedies, including eating certain foods or ingredients that are thought to bring some pain relief. Some have research — not just anecdotal evidence — behind them. All of the following foods have a place in a healthy diet, so eating and cooking with them can be good for you in general . Even so, it’s always a good idea to let your doctor know what kinds of remedies you’re trying to be sure that none will interfere with another.

1. Ginger

Ginger is a root that can be used in flavoring dishes from stir-fry foods to gingerbread cookies. It is most often recommended for easing nausea, but in the lab it’s been found to contain compounds that fight inflammation, which often causes pain. Though clinical studies have not shown it to be consistently effective for joint pain, there are few side effects to including ginger in your diet or consuming it in tablet form.

2. Coffee

In a recently published study, researchers found that even low doses of caffeine (about 100 milligrams, or the amount in a cup of drip-brewed coffee) can help reduce the perception of pain during a painful and exhausting task. Coffee is one of the most common sources of caffeine, but it can be found in other food products, like tea, chocolate, and many sodas. Even if caffeine helps your chronic pain, talk to your doctor about safe levels for you to consume.

3. Olive Oil

Researchers have become interested in the anti-inflammatory benefits of olive oil because people who eat a traditional Mediterranean diet (which is rich in olive oil) seem to have fewer health conditions related to inflammation, such as degenerative joint diseases or diabetes. In fact, extra-virgin olive oil might contain compounds similar to ibuprofen, making it a great oil for cooking foods or in recipes like salad dressings as part of your daily management plan when living with pain.

4. Salmon

Salmon is a deep-sea fish that is rich in omega-3 fatty acids and is a great addition to every diet, even if you aren’t living with pain. Foods with this type of healthy fat are thought to have numerous benefits for health, including a reduction in inflammation. In addition to its healthy fats, salmon also provides calcitonin, which has been shown in clinical studies to reduce the inflammation in joints and may protect against pain from osteoarthritis.

5. Turmeric

Turmeric, also known as curcumin, is a spice that gives curry and other Indian foods their unique yellow color. It also seems to have anti-inflammatory effects and has been studied as a possible way to ease the chronic pain of rheumatoid arthritis. Turmeric comes in capsules if you want to try taking it for pain, but you can also include it in your cooking on a regular basis — it combines well with ginger in curries.

6. Red Grapes

Red grapes contain resveratrol, a chemical compound that is thought to have anti-inflammatory benefits. Resveratrol is also found in foods such as berries and peanuts. In the lab, resveratrol has been shown to stop certain cells in the body from responding to the signals of inflammation, suggesting that it could ultimately help fight pain. Subsequent research has shown that combining resveratrol with turmeric may enhance the ability of both to fight inflammation, important when you’re living with pain.

7. Thyme

Thyme is an herb with tiny, fragrant leaves, used in cooking to enhance the flavors of many foods. Research suggests that compounds in thyme may interfere with the perception of pain, although researchers are not yet entirely sure how the plant accomplishes this. In the lab, thyme was as effective as the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone in reducing pain perception in mice. While investigations continue, try adding thyme to flavor stews, sauces, and other dishes.

Original article here.


Mariano Rivera joins The Michael Kay Show on ESPNNewYork 98.7 FM to discuss his rehab process and if he has a chance to return this season.


Video here: http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=espn:8171661
Injured New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera said Monday that he hopes to pitch again this season.

Rivera has been on the disabled list since May 4 after tearing his right ACL while shagging balls prior to a game against Kansas City.

"That’s my goal," Rivera said Monday on "The Michael Kay Show" on 98.7 FM ESPNNewYork. "I don’t think about it because if it doesn’t happen, I will be kind of like disappointed. I take it day by day. I’m working hard and doing what I do. … That’s the way I’m thinking, day by day and positive, definitely. Optimism, positive. Whatever the Lord will allow to happen, will happen."



Mariano Rivera: 7/16

Yankees reliever Mariano Rivera talks about a possible return to the mound this season.



Rivera, though, would not definitely say he will be returning in September for the pennant push.

"I don’t know," Rivera said. "I can’t answer that. I don’t know. I want to, I want to be there now, but if there is any chance, only God knows."

While Rivera is optimistic about his chances, the Yankees don’t seem as confident he will be return this year. The New York Post reported Yankees general manager Brian Cashman as saying: “in terms of 2012, he’s out.”

Yankees manager Joe Girardi has also said the team doesn’t believe Rivera will return this year.

Even Dr. Keith Pyne, who told the Post that Rivera is ahead of schedule in his recovery, said at the moment the closer would not be returning.

"Right now, he’s shut down until next year," Pyne told the paper.

When Rivera initially suffered the injury he vowed to return next season under the assumption he would not be playing this year.

Rivera was not sure if a return this season, even if capped off by a World Series title, would make him change his mind and instead head into retirement. The closer had given some indications that 2012 perhaps could have been the final year of his career.

"I don’t know, I’d have to think about it" Rivera said. "The few months I’ve had the injury, it’s been different. I’ve seen the game and I’ve spent time with the family. I can’t stop thinking about the game. It’s hard. That would be a decision when it comes, I cannot regret it."

Rivera had surgery more than a month ago on his right knee and he said the rehab as been going quicker than expected. The surgery had been postponed for more than a month after a blood clot was found in his right calf.


A burning question surrounding the Yankees over the past decade has been how the team would fare over a long stretch without Rivera, who could be argued to be the most indispensible Yankee.


The team has responded positively thus far, and Rivera is not surprised with the team’s success in his absence entering Monday’s game against Toronto.

"I know the team is capable to do that," Rivera said. "In every area in the team we have someone who can come in and do the same job the other guy was doing, maybe even better. I always said the Yankees have done a tremendous job in putting a team together. It’s just one of those times. We lost key players and the other guys picked it up and kept running with it, so that’s wonderful."

One of those players is Rafael Soriano, who has thrived as the closer. Soriano has blown just one save this year in 23 attempts and has a dazzling 1.51 ERA spanning 35 2/3 innings. He had been solid when serving as the team’s seventh and eighth-inning man over the past two years, but he’s pitched his best since replacing Rivera as the team’s closer.

"(He’s) done a tremendous job with that and brought some stability," Rivera said. "I went down and they tried to put David Robertson in. Sori was the guy and he has the experience and he has ability, he’s done it before. He has done a tremendous job in the closer’s role. It’s wonderful to do that. He’s showing a great desire. Hopefully we keep doing the same.”

Matt Ehalt is a frequent contributor to ESPNNewYork.com.

Original Article here.
Mariano Rivera joins The Michael Kay Show on ESPNNewYork 98.7 FM to discuss his rehab process and if he has a chance to return this season.

Video here: http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=espn:8171661

Injured New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera said Monday that he hopes to pitch again this season.

Rivera has been on the disabled list since May 4 after tearing his right ACL while shagging balls prior to a game against Kansas City.

"That’s my goal," Rivera said Monday on "The Michael Kay Show" on 98.7 FM ESPNNewYork. "I don’t think about it because if it doesn’t happen, I will be kind of like disappointed. I take it day by day. I’m working hard and doing what I do. … That’s the way I’m thinking, day by day and positive, definitely. Optimism, positive. Whatever the Lord will allow to happen, will happen."

Rivera, though, would not definitely say he will be returning in September for the pennant push.

"I don’t know," Rivera said. "I can’t answer that. I don’t know. I want to, I want to be there now, but if there is any chance, only God knows."

While Rivera is optimistic about his chances, the Yankees don’t seem as confident he will be return this year. The New York Post reported Yankees general manager Brian Cashman as saying: “in terms of 2012, he’s out.”

Yankees manager Joe Girardi has also said the team doesn’t believe Rivera will return this year.

Even Dr. Keith Pyne, who told the Post that Rivera is ahead of schedule in his recovery, said at the moment the closer would not be returning.

"Right now, he’s shut down until next year," Pyne told the paper.

When Rivera initially suffered the injury he vowed to return next season under the assumption he would not be playing this year.

Rivera was not sure if a return this season, even if capped off by a World Series title, would make him change his mind and instead head into retirement. The closer had given some indications that 2012 perhaps could have been the final year of his career.

"I don’t know, I’d have to think about it" Rivera said. "The few months I’ve had the injury, it’s been different. I’ve seen the game and I’ve spent time with the family. I can’t stop thinking about the game. It’s hard. That would be a decision when it comes, I cannot regret it."

Rivera had surgery more than a month ago on his right knee and he said the rehab as been going quicker than expected. The surgery had been postponed for more than a month after a blood clot was found in his right calf.

The team has responded positively thus far, and Rivera is not surprised with the team’s success in his absence entering Monday’s game against Toronto.

"I know the team is capable to do that," Rivera said. "In every area in the team we have someone who can come in and do the same job the other guy was doing, maybe even better. I always said the Yankees have done a tremendous job in putting a team together. It’s just one of those times. We lost key players and the other guys picked it up and kept running with it, so that’s wonderful."

One of those players is Rafael Soriano, who has thrived as the closer. Soriano has blown just one save this year in 23 attempts and has a dazzling 1.51 ERA spanning 35 2/3 innings. He had been solid when serving as the team’s seventh and eighth-inning man over the past two years, but he’s pitched his best since replacing Rivera as the team’s closer.

"(He’s) done a tremendous job with that and brought some stability," Rivera said. "I went down and they tried to put David Robertson in. Sori was the guy and he has the experience and he has ability, he’s done it before. He has done a tremendous job in the closer’s role. It’s wonderful to do that. He’s showing a great desire. Hopefully we keep doing the same.”

Matt Ehalt is a frequent contributor to ESPNNewYork.com.

Original Article here.

11 Pain Control Techniques

11 Chronic Pain Control Techniques

Here are some pain control techniques that our doctors agree with!

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To prepare for any chronic pain coping technique, it is important to learn how to use focus and deep breathing to relax the body. Learning to relax takes practice, especially when you are in pain, but it is definitely worth it to be able to release muscle tension throughout the body and start to remove attention from the pain.

Coping techniques for chronic pain begin with controlled deep breathing, as follows:

  • Try putting yourself in a relaxed, reclining position in a dark room. Either shut your eyes or focus on a point.
  • Then begin to slow down your breathing. Breathe deeply, using your chest. If you find your mind wandering or you are distracted, then think of a word, such as the word “Relax”, and think it in time with your breathing…the syllable “re” as you breathe in and “lax” as you breathe out.
  • Continue with about 2 to 3 minutes of controlled breathing.
  • Once you feel yourself slowing down, you can begin to use imagery techniques.
Eleven specific imagery and chronic pain control techniques that are effective for pain control include:
  1. Altered focus
    This is a favorite technique for demonstrating how powerfully the mind can alter sensations in the body. Focus your attention on any specific non-painful part of the body (hand, foot, etc.) and alter sensation in that part of the body. For example, imagine your hand warming up. This will take the mind away from focusing on the source of your pain, such as your back pain.

  2. Dissociation
    As the name implies, this chronic pain technique involves mentally separating the painful body part from the rest of the body, or imagining the body and mind as separate, with the chronic pain distant from one’s mind. For example, imagine your painful lower back sitting on a chair across the room and tell it to stay sitting there, far away from your mind.

  3. Sensory splitting
    This technique involves dividing the sensation (pain, burning, pins and needles) into separate parts. For example, if the leg pain or back pain feels hot to you, focus just on the sensation of the heat and not on the hurting.

  4. Mental anesthesia
    This involves imagining an injection of numbing anesthetic (like Novocain) into the painful area, such as imagining a numbing solution being injected into your low back. Similarly, you may then wish to imagine a soothing and cooling ice pack being placed onto the area of pain.

  5. Mental analgesia
    Building on the mental anesthesia concept, this technique involves imagining an injection of a strong pain killer, such as morphine, into the painful area. Alternatively, you can imagine your brain producing massive amount of endorphins, the natural pain relieving substance of the body, and having them flow to the painful parts of your body.
  1. Transfer
    Use your mind to produce altered sensations, such as heat, cold, anesthetic, in a non-painful hand, and then place the hand on the painful area. Envision transferring this pleasant, altered sensation into the painful area.

  2. Age progression/regression
    Use your mind’s eye to project yourself forward or backward in time to when you are pain-free or experiencing much less pain. Then instruct yourself to act “as if” this image were true.

  3. Symbolic imagery
    Envision a symbol that represents your chronic pain, such as a loud, irritating noise or a painfully bright light bulb. Gradually reduce the irritating qualities of this symbol, for example dim the light or reduce the volume of the noise, thereby reducing the pain.

  4. Positive imagery
    Focus your attention on a pleasant place that you could imagine going - the beach, mountains, etc. - where you feel carefree, safe and relaxed.

  5. Counting
    Silent counting is a good way to deal with painful episodes. You might count breaths, count holes in an acoustic ceiling, count floor tiles, or simply conjure up mental images and count them.

  6. Pain movement
    Move chronic back pain from one area of your body to another, where the pain is easier to cope with. For example, mentally move your chronic back pain slowly into your hand, or even out of your hand into the air.

Some of these techniques are probably best learned with the help of a professional, and it usually takes practice for these techniques to become effective in helping alleviate chronic pain. It is often advisable to work on pain coping strategies for about 30 minutes 3 times a week. With practice, you will find that the relaxation and chronic pain control become stronger and last longer after you are done.

Sometimes, after you are good at using the techniques, you can produce chronic pain relief and relaxation with just a few deep breaths. You can then start to use these techniques while you are engaged in any activity, working, talking, etc. With enough experience you will begin to feel a greater sense of control over the chronic pain and its effects on your life.

Article from Andrew R. Block, PhD

Celebrity Health Quotes

Living healthy isn’t always easy, not even for celebrities.

“If you’re trying to achieve, there will be roadblocks. I’ve had them; everybody has had them. But obstacles don’t have to stop you. If you run into a wall, don’t turn around and give up. Figure out how to climb it, go through it, or work around it.”

-Michael Jordan

“The key thing is figuring out what your issues are, and it’s really never about the food. You have to be real and honest with yourself. I had to stop and look and ask myself, ‘Why do I want this? What is the real reason?’ At times it was comfort food like chocolate. I love chocolate and I realized it relaxes me, so when you acknowledge what the issue is, you can control it better.”

-Jennifer Hudson

"To give anything less than your best is to sacrifice the gift,” and “You have to wonder at times what you’re doing out there. Over the years, I’ve given myself a thousand reasons to keep running, but it always comes back to where it started. It comes down to self-satisfaction and a sense of achievement."

- Steve Prefontaine

“What I know for sure is this: The big secret in life is that there is no big secret. Whatever your goal for this year is, you can get there — as long as you’re willing to be honest with yourself about the preparation and work involved. There are no back doors, no free rides. There’s just you, this moment, and a choice.”

-Oprah Winfrey

"Immediately when I found out that I had the part, I thought it would be best to be able to have something to work towards or else I’ll stick to my fried food and Taco Bell. To have something, a goal, is awesome.”

- Jessica Simpson

“I’m not going to lie, it’s really hard. When you don’t have time to work out, you have to be really meticulous about your diet. And when you do have time to work out, make it count.”

- Jillian Michaels

“I hated every minute of the training, but I said: ‘Don’t quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion.’”

- Muhammad Ali

“If you don’t do what’s best for your body, you’re the one who comes up on the short end.”

- Julius Erving

"People will get into the habit of doing the same thing over and over again, and you’ll stop seeing changes in your body. If you add variety and spice things up, I think it’ll help you to stay motivated."

- Dara Torres

What Those with Chronic Pain or Illness DO Want to Hear You Say

As a follow-up to last week’s piece, “What Those with Chronic Pain or Illness DON’T Want to Hear You Say”, I thought it might be helpful to let others know what we wish they would say to us.

Visit us at http://www.oscsurgical.com/ to help manage your pain!

“You look so good, but how are you really feeling?”

It’s hard for us to respond to comments like, “You look so good” (or the always dreaded, “But you don’t look sick”) because we know that you’re just trying to be nice. If we respond truthfully with, “Thanks, but I feel awful,” you might be embarrassed or think we’re being ungrateful. It would be such a relief to be asked a question that goes to the heart of the matter: “How are you really feeling?”

“I’m going to the grocery store, can I pick anything up for you?”

This is a helpful question, as opposed to, “Call me if there’s anything I can do” (from last week’s piece). As I said there, we’re unlikely to respond to such an open-ended offer, meaning we won’t call and say, “Can you go to the grocery store and get me some dish soap?” We don’t want to make you go somewhere that you aren’t otherwise going. But if you let us know that you’re already going to the store, that’s a different matter entirely!

In fact, the more specific your offer of help, the better. For example, we’d love to hear an offer to do one of those life tasks that back up for us because we’re not well enough to get to it: take our car for an oil change (we’ll pay for it!); weed in our garden for a bit; do a load of laundry; even clean our refrigerator.

“It must be hard to be sick and in pain all the time,” or “Not being able to work must be so frustrating,” or “I imagine it’s a daily grind to have to pace yourself so carefully.”

These comments are examples of “active listening,” a child raising technique I learned when my two kids were young. I wasn’t always as skillful at it as I wanted to be, but the idea is to let your kids know you’ve really heard their concerns by feeding back to them, in your own words, what they’ve said.

For example, if your daughter is afraid of the dark, instead of trying to talk her out of how she’s feeling by saying, “There’s no reason to be afraid of the dark,” or “You’re too old to be afraid of the dark,” you feed back her feelings to her by saying, “The dark is scary to you.” When you actively listen in this way, children feel heard and validated. This makes it easier for them to overcome a fear because they know you’re taking their concern seriously and that you’re trying to understand it from their point of view. We who are chronically ill want to feel heard and validated. We want to know that you understand how we feel. In fact, everyone—sick or not—wants know that others understand them!

To active listen, put yourself in another’s shoes and think about how you’d feel if you were in his or her circumstances. Then feed those feelings back by saying, for example, “You must feel sad and disappointed that you can’t go to the party.” I hope all of you have experienced the relief that comes from feeling deeply listened to.

“How are you holding up? Do we need to stop visiting so you can rest?”

What a blessing it would be to hear a visitor offer this “prompt.” I’ve lost count of the number of times my body was telling me to lie down, but I didn’t excuse myself. Even if we’re wilting away or are in bad pain, most of us are unlikely to bring it up ourselves because we don’t want to let you down. But if we know you’re aware of and sensitive to our limitations, we’ll respond honestly.

“I miss going out to lunch together,” or “I miss going to the movies with you,” or “I miss going to the mall together.”

Speaking personally, I want to hear a heartfelt expression of the way you feel about how things have changed for us. It lets me know that you value our relationship.

“Don’t feel bad if you have to cancel our plans at the last minute. I’ll understand.”

What a relief this would be to hear! I used to force myself to keep commitments even if I was too sick to leave the house. Invariably, it led to a bad “crash.” I’m much better now about cancelling plans if I have to, but I still feel bad about it unless those plans were made with one of my “it’s okay to cancel” friends. I treasure them.

“Would you like to hear about his crazy adventure I had yesterday?”

You bet I would! Some friends don’t want to tell me about what they’re up to, especially if it’s something exciting. They think that talking about their lives will make me feel bad since I’m so limited in what I can do. But hearing about another’s adventure makes me feel connected to the world and adds real-life adventure to what I often just have to get off the TV.

“I hope you’re as well as possible.”

To those of us living day-to-day with health challenges, this is comment is so spot-on that many of us just use the initials AWAP when communicating with each other, as in, “I hope you’re AWAP.” Reflecting on this, wouldn’t it be a compassionate comment to make to anyone? Everybody has his or her share of stresses and sorrows—in sickness and in health. And so, my wish for everyone reading this piece is that you’re AWAP.

Is there something you wish friends or family would say to you? Please feel free to share it with others the comments section.

© 2012 Toni Bernhard http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/turning-straw-gold/201207/what-those-chronic-pain-or-illness-do-want-hear-you-say

What Those with Chronic Pain or Illness DON’T Want to Hear You Say

Even the well-intentioned often don’t know how to talk to the chronically ill.

The purpose of this piece is not to make fun of those whose comments are off the mark; most people have good intentions. I’ve written it partly because I hope it will make those of us with health difficulties feel less alone and partly because I hope it will help others understand how to communicate with us better. Each of the following comments has been made to me at least once since I became ill in 2001.

“Give me a call if there’s anything I can do.”

It’s highly improbable that this well-intentioned comment will result in my picking up the phone. You’ve put the ball in my court and I’m unlikely to hit it back, either because I’m too shy, too embarrassed, too proud, too sick—or a combination of the four. I’m not going to call and say, “Can you come over and do my laundry?” But if you call and offer to come over and do it, I’ll gratefully say, “yes”!

“I wish I could lie in bed and watch TV all day long.”

It may sound like this couldn’t possibly have been a well-intentioned comment, but given the tone of voice in which it was said to me over the phone, I’m certain it was. I believe that the hard-working friend who said it was genuinely thinking, “Lucky you to have so much leisure time.” When she said it, I was still so sensitive about being sick—including being worried that people might think I was a malingerer—that tears came to my eyes. Then I wanted to scream, “You have no idea how it feels to be sick and stuck in bed with no choice but to watch TV!” Instead of screaming, I mumbled something and got off the phone as soon as I could because I could feel the sobs coming—as they did as soon as I hung up.

 “Disease is a message from your soul, telling you that something is wrong with your True Self.”

This is an excerpt from one of dozens of emails I’ve received from people trying to diagnose and/or cure me. I must admit that I have no idea what that sentence means. Are the soul and the True Self different entities, and the one that is okay is sending a message to the other one saying that something’s wrong with it? Bottom line: This is not helpful! Oh, and another person said she’d assist me to get my health back—free of charge—by showing me how to do soul retrieval. Sigh.

“The third cousin of my brother-in-law’s sister’s best friend had what you have and said she got better by drinking bottled water.”

Another sigh.

“Have you tried sleeping pills?”

Sleeping pills? Who hasn’t tried sleeping pills? Even healthy people do! Sleeping pills may be helpful for some people, but they are not a cure for chronic pain or illness. And while we’re on the subject of “Have you tried…” If it’s available by prescription, I’ve tried it. If it’s available as a supplement, I’ve tried it. If it’s available as a Chinese herb, I’ve tried it. If it’s available at all, the odds are very high: I’ve tried it

“Just don’t think about it.”

This comment left me speechless…but still thinking about “it.”

“Aren’t you worried that you’re getting out of shape from living such a sedentary lifestyle?”

Uh…yes. Thanks for reminding me.

“Have you Googled your symptoms?”

Let me count the ways.

“At least you still have your sense of humor.”

Thanks, but I’d rather be known as humorless but healthy

Article from: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/turning-straw-gold/201206/what-those-chronic-pain-or-illness-don-t-want-hear-you-say

5 Tips to Prevent Neck Pain


Too many people have neck pain. The most common causes of neck pain that I see from day to day are the result of bad habits or poor ergonomics. Please take a look at the following points and make an effort to correct them. Your neck will thank you. 

1. Center your monitor. People who sit at a computer with the screen even slightly off to the side are ultimately doomed. This results in the head turned to one side. If this is a temporary position of the neck, it is not a big problem. If you sit at a desk for eight hours or more a day, neck pain is waiting to happen. Need I say that this is very easy to correct. Center your screen over your keyboard. 

2. Check your lighting. If your desk lighting is insufficient, your head will have the tendency to crane forward to read off the computer screen. A forward position of the head places undo stress on the upper vertebrae of the neck and the sub-occipital muscles at the base of the head. Headaches are often the result. 

3. Get your eyes checked. Uncorrected near or far-sightedness can cause craning of the head similar to that mentioned with poor lighting. 

Occasionally I will also see a patient who turns his or her head slightly to the side in order to see directly ahead. These people have learned to rely more on their peripheral vision to focus on objects due to a condition known as strabismus. 

4. Do not sleep on your stomach. The only way to breathe effectively in this position is to turn your head to one side. Hopefully it is becoming clear to you that sustained neck rotation is a bad thing. 

5. Do not read or watch television lying down. This bad habit is particularly devastating to necks. It usually results in both a forward and a rotated position of the neck, a double whammy. Some patients’ neck symptoms will go away entirely simply by correcting this bad habit. 

If your neck pain radiates down your arm, see a doctor. This is more serious than simple neck pain and may involve irritation of the nerves as they exit the spine. Regardless of the extent of injury to your neck, It is still a good idea to correct your bad habits and check your ergonomics.

Visit our website for more information on easing your pain.

Easy Steps to Prevent Sports Injuries

1.        Make Stretching A Daily Habit: We need flexibility to be able to perform the best we can in any sport.  The problem is that we rarely stretch on a daily basis.  Starting a daily stretching program is vital for injury prevention!

2.       Proper Form: No matter what exercise or sport you’re participating in, it’s important to make sure that you understand how to properly perform the movements involved.  Small changes in angle or speed can create dangerous pressures on your muscles and joints.

3.      Never Ignore Pain: The motto “No pain, no gain” is only true if the pain you’re experiencing is good muscle soreness that comes from working out.  If you notice that your pain is sharp or lasts for more than 24 hrs, you need to rest, stretch and ice the area, not work through the discomfort.

4.     Using Protective Gear: Wearing protective gear in any sport, can save your life. Use helmets, pads, knee braces to keep yourself from getting a very serious injury!

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Words from Doctor Al: 

Knee Injury ?

 



This information may help in knee injury cases. The four major stabilizing ligaments of the knee are the Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligaments (ACL and PCL), and the Medial and Lateral Collateral Ligaments (MCL and LCL).  Each of the four ligaments is critical to the stability of the knee joint. A ligament is made of tough fibrous material and functions to control range motion by limiting excessive movements of the joint.  Each Ligament is positioned differently, to stabilize the knee joint by resisting abnormal stresses of the joint and preventing the knee from dislocating.



Injuries: The knee joint is usually injured when the knee joint is significantly stressed, to cause it to be overstretched. This force causes the knee stretch too far, making it susceptible to tearing and injury. Sports, auto and work injuries often are associated with a traumatic blow, an abrupt stop, a turn, a twist and/or a stress overload of the knee.



An injury to the knee joint may occur as open type of isolated injury, or it may be part of a complex injury to the knee. Often, the meniscus may be torn and also the ACL, MCL, PCL or LCL may be injured.



Symptoms: The most common injury symptom is pain directly over the injured ligament.  Local swelling, bruising and generalized joint swelling are common after the injury. In more severe injuries, the knee feels unstable, or feels as though the knee ‘give out’ or buckles. Symptoms may correlate with the extent of the injury. A knee brace or a knee immobilizer may be needed for comfort, and healing may take weeks or longer.



Treatment: Treatment depends on the severity of the injury. Treatment always begins with allowing the pain and swelling to subside, beginning work on mobility, followed by strengthening the knee prior to a return to sports and work activities. Bracing can often be useful for treatment of MCL injuries. Electrical Stimulation therapy may help. Injection therapy to reduce inflammation, pain and promote healing may help.  An MRI and X-ray may be needed.  Surgery may be necessary depending on the type of injury.



For a thorough assessment come see us and visit us at PainDoc4u.com or see our orthopedist.



Thanks

 

Dr Al

Words from Doctor Al:

Knee Injury ?

 

This information may help in knee injury cases. The four major stabilizing ligaments of the knee are the Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligaments (ACL and PCL), and the Medial and Lateral Collateral Ligaments (MCL and LCL).  Each of the four ligaments is critical to the stability of the knee joint. A ligament is made of tough fibrous material and functions to control range motion by limiting excessive movements of the joint.  Each Ligament is positioned differently, to stabilize the knee joint by resisting abnormal stresses of the joint and preventing the knee from dislocating.

Injuries: The knee joint is usually injured when the knee joint is significantly stressed, to cause it to be overstretched. This force causes the knee stretch too far, making it susceptible to tearing and injury. Sports, auto and work injuries often are associated with a traumatic blow, an abrupt stop, a turn, a twist and/or a stress overload of the knee.

An injury to the knee joint may occur as open type of isolated injury, or it may be part of a complex injury to the knee. Often, the meniscus may be torn and also the ACL, MCL, PCL or LCL may be injured.

Symptoms: The most common injury symptom is pain directly over the injured ligament.  Local swelling, bruising and generalized joint swelling are common after the injury. In more severe injuries, the knee feels unstable, or feels as though the knee ‘give out’ or buckles. Symptoms may correlate with the extent of the injury. A knee brace or a knee immobilizer may be needed for comfort, and healing may take weeks or longer.

Treatment: Treatment depends on the severity of the injury. Treatment always begins with allowing the pain and swelling to subside, beginning work on mobility, followed by strengthening the knee prior to a return to sports and work activities. Bracing can often be useful for treatment of MCL injuries.Offline Electrical Stimulation therapy may help. Injection therapy to reduce inflammation, pain and promote healing may help.  An MRI and X-ray may be needed.  Surgery may be necessary depending on the type of injury.

For a thorough assessment come see us and visit us at PainDoc4u.com or see our orthopedist.

Thanks

 

Dr Al